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Fishing without bait...

Was checking out the regular spot and just doing some light casting... it's an outlet canal where excess reservoir water is discharged into the sea. I had many bites and misses from the big school of garfishes around. However what caught my attention more was a couple of middle aged dudes doing "baitless fishing" what i refer to as opportunistic fishing....


You see, this morning was raining hard and the reservoir water had to be let out and when that happened large amount of water together with freshwater fishes were being discharged into the sea... the apparent high salinity stuns the freshwater fishes and they struggle on the water surface... they become weak and will eventually die from the inability to adapt to a sudden rise in the salinity index. These "uncles" are bringing in Kilograms worth of fishes without using any baits. How they do it is simple, they have a anchor like rig made up of hooks quite like the larger version of a squid jig.. they will spot any struggling fish being released from the reservoir and try to false-hook them up... one by one they got a wide variety of fishes... in a way this is good because they will consume these fishes that will die for sure if no one picks them up like they do...


Unintentionally I casted toward what i tought was a fish rise and just like them my lure snagged onto a struggling Peacock Bass...

9 comments:

Thomas said...

That is really cool! Good that the resources are being used :)

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Anonymous said...

Hi,

Did you eat the pb?

GoneFishing said...

I gave the PB to one of the uncle there... he eats them .. he said he cooks it like a grouper - Deep Fry + Sweet and sour sauce ....

Jimmy said...

Never thought PB can eat!

Anonymous said...

Can.. most fishes can be eaten ..just that you haven't tried or dare not try.

PEACOCK BASS FISH FRY

2 lbs. cleaned peacock bass (or as many as you care to cook)
1 pkg. your favorite fish fry mixture (Louanna is available in local Commissaries)
1-2 gal. cooking oil

EQUIPMENT: Propane-fueled deep fat fryer. (Available from MWR if you don't have one.) Large slotted spoon or tongs. Metal or glass thermometer large enough to clip onto fry pot and reach into the oil. Must register up to 400 degrees. Two large brown paper bags. Cookie sheet(s), paper towels.
PROCEDURE:

Rinse fish fillets well, cut out the small ridge of bones remaining at the forward center part of each filet, and continue to cut to split the filet. Splitting the filets gives more uniform pieces which handle and present nicely. Place prepared filets in plastic bag(s) until ready to fry. Try to ensure a minimum of water is in the bag with the fish. Filets will need some moisture to bind the fry mixture to them, but too much moisture will cause splattering in the hot oil.

Set up the deep fat fryer in a safe spot on concrete or other firm footing under or by your house. Affix the thermometer to the pot rim and add the cooking oil to fill the pot about halfway or until the thermometer can reach into it. Too much oil can result in it bubbling over the top during the frying process.

Light the gas and bring up a strong flame so you won't spend too much time waiting for the oil to come up to the REQUIRED 375 DEGREES for frying your fish.

Meanwhile, make a strong shake-em-up bag by opening one of the brown paper bags and then opening the other inside it. Empty a package of your favorite fish fry mixture into the double bag. (Some folks like to add powdered curry to the plain or lemon flavored mixture. It takes one large or two small jars of curry powder to give a nice curry flavor to the fish.)

Line the cookie sheet(s) with 2-4 layers of paper toweling. Carry the cookie sheets, shake-em-up bag with mixture, slotted spoon, and bag(s) of fish to the cooking area

When the oil reaches 375 degrees, put 12 or so filets into the shake- em-up bag and shake well to coat each filet with the mixture. Gently shake each filet as you take it form the bag to remove excess mixture. Slide each into the hot oil. Do not drop them in so as to splash the oil. When the filets float on the surface of the oil, they are done. Remove immediately from the oil using the slotted spoon, pausing a moment for excess oil to drain away, and place in a single layer on a toweled cookie sheet.

NOTES ON FRYING FISH:

Frying fish leaves a distinctive odor and makes a significant contribution to the greasy film which tends to accumulate on everything in or near a kitchen even under the best of circumstances. For this reason, I recommend frying fish out-of-doors when at all possible.

If you are cooking a large quantity of fish to serve at one time, preheat your oven to 200 degrees. As the sheets of fried fish come from the cooker, place them in the warm oven until ready to serve. A few minutes in the warm oven will allow more oil to drain from the fish, however, too much time may result in dry, chewy fish.

Keep a close watch on the oil temperature throughout the cooking process and adjust the flame accordingly. If oil temperature exceeds 400 degrees you will likely get overdone fish. If it drops below 350 degrees, you will likely get watery, oily fish.

The cooking oil may be reuseable, depending on the amount of fry mix particles that end up in it and the temperature it has reached. If the oil has become too hot for too long it will give a burned taste to anything fried in it later. Tightly cover the oil after turning out the flame to help keep it reuseable. Note that koatimundis like cooking oil very much, especially if it is fish flavored, and take appropriate precautions.

LeeK said...

http://www.tourapure.com/Fresh%20fried%20peacock%20bass.jpg

Anonymous said...

Where is the fishing spot?

GoneFishing said...

It's at Yishun dam